We’re short of nowt in Yorkshire

Yorkshire bridgeI received a card this week wishing me a Happy Yorkshire Christmas. It got me imagining Santa wearing a festive red flat cap, shouting ‘Ey up! Narthen! Sithee!’ as he travelled across the Broad Acres on a sleigh pulled by half a dozen whippets. Then I read somewhere that some chap was complaining about not seeing any sweeping plantations in the county where Yorkshire Tea is grown. I tweeted that despite the lack of tea-growing, folk can visit the forests of Pudsey where Yorkshire Puddings are scratched from the ground by specially trained ferrets. And that you can watch traditional divers off the coast of Scarborough who risk their lives searching the Great Yorkshire Reef for Yorkshire Mixtures. Yorkshire Parkin is still quarried from prehistoric deposits in Giggleswick of course. And Yorkshire Curd Tarts are produced in darkened sheds throughout the Yorkshire Dales by Yorkshire Women in pinnies mixing Yorkshire Water and Yorkshire Milk while supping Yorkshire Best Bitter. We’re short of nowt here.

Yorkshire quarryI see that Giggleswick Quarry (that’s the limestone one, not the Parkin quarry) has been put up for sale. It will be interesting to see what happens to it – and what is allowed. I always thought that quarry owners in the Dales were supposed to restore any former workings once they’d been plundered, not just sell them off to the highest bidder for the new users to take on responsibility. So I looked on the Dales Environment Network website – it states:
‘We have an obligation to restore quarry sites once we have finished working them, and in the Dales we do so in partnership with a number of organisations such as the National Park Authority, Natural England, the Wildlife Trust and Dales Millennium Trust. Giggleswick quarry was closed in 2009, and is now undergoing the process of restoration. As with Old Ingleton quarry, we will be primarily relying on natural regeneration – however this is being supported by native tree planting and broadcasting of wildflower seed mixes across the site.’
So I’m left a little confused. Not being one of Her Majesty’s card-carrying investigative journalists any more, I won’t be following this up but wonder if anyone else has bothered to ask what’s happening? Perhaps the quarry owners have actually fulfilled their statutory obligations – I don’t know, but viewed from the path above, the quarry just looks like a big Yorkshire Hole.

Yorkshire birkdaletarnOne hole in the Dales is Birkdale Tarn – the third largest expanse of water in the Dales after Malham Tarn and Semerwater. At 1600ft it’s the highest of the three, best for solitude and hardest to photograph!

Yorkshire blackIt’s a bit black ovver t’back o’Bill’s mother’s.

cloudsray

I couldn’t go a week without a photo of Winskill, could I? ….

Yorkshire winskilltree

Fabulous sky above Ribblehead Viaduct…

ribblehead2

Small screens don’t do justice to panoramic views but I recommend looking at this one of the Howgills, taken a little while back, on a computer if possible.

howgillspan

Penyghent made but a brief appearance from under its shroud during the week…

pygmist

Despite slipping and landing on my backside in the mud, a trip down to Stainforth Foss this week was worthwhile. The repaired packhorse bridge (top photo in blog) looked much better and the river was lively. Here are a couple more photos and video link.

foss

foss1

 

One thought on “We’re short of nowt in Yorkshire”

  1. The very same thoughts crossed my mind about Giggleswick quarry.

    Hard to imagine what sort of future use might be acceptable in a national park. It might be helpful to know if the YDNPA have had any ideas. Probably too much to expect as they are more often in the position of knocking good but non-policy-conforming ideas on the head.

    I am possibly in a minority in thinking that what remains of former quarries can actually enhance, or at least give character to the Dales landscape, eventually becoming a ‘natural’ part of it. Langcliffe is a good example, towering above the Hoffman and other kilns. Even some working quarries contribute. A stroll round Dry Rigg and Arcow is highly recommended, especially now that stone is going out by rail. Two trainloads a day indeed. If only Horton quarry followed suit; what a difference that would make.

    The scenery around Malham (why does my spell-checker always try for Balham?) owes a great deal to man’s intervention as well as God’s.

    Interesting opportunities in the Dales.

    Mark Rand
    Settle (not Seattle)

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

%d bloggers like this: