Reasons to love Ribblesdale

LangcliffeLangcliffe in Ribblesdale – a calendar for the new year. I’ve collected together some of my favourite shots from around the lovely village of Langcliffe where I live. There is a printed version in the village church of St John’s should anyone be interested. Have a great new year by the Ribble. At the end of the blog is a stirring ancient poem about Ribblesdale to get you in the mood for a visit.

Langcliffe

Langcliffe

Langcliffe

Langcliffe

Langcliffe

Ribblesdale

Ribblesdale

Ribblesdale

Ribblesdale

Ribblesdale

Ribblesdale

Ribblesdale

The Lads Of Ribblesdale

How oft I’ve heard of Tiber’s stream where Rome’s fair city stands,
And oft I’ve heard of the glorious Rhine, away in foreign lands;
While Beranger and Lamartine can many a soul inspire
With songs of vine-clad mountains on the banks of Rhone and Loire.

For years proud London’s mighty arms have hugged old Father Thames,
And Shakespeare left sweet Avon’s banks wreathed with eternal gems;
While Falconer praised Killarney’s Falls, Sam Lover and Tom Moore
Immortalised the many streams that grace old Erin’s shore.

Some climb the hills and castles in the pleasant vale of Wye,
And by the Tweed some think of wars oft fought in days gone by;
While other hearts with rapture throb to nature’s purest tune
Sung by the Prince of Scottish Bards along the banks of Doon.

Still Craven lads, lift up your heads, there’s yet another stream
You’ve played beside in infancy and seen in midnight dream;
Where gallant men from Cæsar’s land deserted beauteous Rome,
And on the Ribble’s fertile banks were proud to make a home.

King Stephen marched and Ribble banks a rebel band to find;
King John held court in Ribblesdale ere he the “Charta” signed;
King Edward First and Edward Third at Preston longed to stay
And view the stream where John o’ Gaunt passed many a happy day.

Then stern old Scotia’s hardy sons our vaunted strength withstood,
By fiery Bruce the Ribble then was stained with human blood;
Then Henry Fourth to Clitheroe came a charter to bequeath;
Then Henry Sixth near Ribble hid, ‘mid danger, want, and death.

King James came down to Ribblesdale to hunt for witch and deer,
And after Worcester’s famous fight Charles Second dwelt down here;
And Cromwell said his bravest troops, that turned the Stuarts pale,
Were the bold unbeaten Bowland boys that dwelt in Ribblesdale.

Then here’s success to Craven lads, who love their native soil,
May rich have heart to freely give, the poor have strength to toil;
May peace and comfort claim each cot that stands within the vale,
Which the Roman, King, and cottar loved, historic Ribblesdale.

Taken from “The Poets and Poetry of Blackburn (1793-1902)” by George Hull J & G Toulmin

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

%d bloggers like this: